• 20 Jul, 2024

Mukesh Ambani - ANTILIA House Tour

Regardless of how one views it, everyone wants to learn more about India's richest man's luxurious escape, and international interest is growing. Welcome to “Planet Lux'' and in this video, we’ll see the house tour and some facts about Antilia.

"Mukesh Ambani - ANTILIA House Tour" Provides a look into the extravagant 27-story skyscraper, Antilia, owned by India's richest man, Mukesh Ambani, and his family. Located in Mumbai, Antilia boasts luxurious features such as a snow room, movie theater, and in-house hairdresser. Despite the controversy surrounding its acquisition, which included disputes over the intended use of the land and allegations of purchasing at a lower price, Antilia is now complete and employs approximately 600 people. The house, inspired by a fabled Atlantic island, includes a temple, theater, ice cream parlor, salon, dance studio, health spa, ballroom, yoga studio, and three Olympic-sized swimming pools. The top floors are reserved for the family's private living space, while the lower levels house parking for 168 cars and a garage with a private auto service station. Critics, including Ratan Tata and Arundhati Roy, have expressed concerns about the wealth disparity and the Ambanis' perceived disconnection from their impoverished origins. Despite the controversy, Antilia's opulence and luxury continue to draw admiration from many. 

We take a tour of Antilia, the 2 billion dollar house of Mukesh Ambani, India's richest man and chairman of Reliance Industries. Located on Altamount Road in Mumbai, Antilia is a 27-story skyscraper with extravagant features, including a snow room, a movie theater, and an in-house hairdresser. Despite rumors of its construction amidst Mumbai's slums, Antilia's meticulous building began and is now a reminder of the wealth and luxury that resides in the area. The Ambani family, which includes his wife Nita and their three children, moved into Antilia in September 2011 following a major puja and Vastu ceremony. The house, designed to survive an earthquake with a Richter magnitude of 8.0, is reported to be the world's highest house owned by a single family, standing at 173 meters tall. It also employs approximately 600 people, who have a large room set aside for rest. The interior design is inspired by a fabled Atlantic island and includes a temple, theater, ice cream parlor, salon, dance studio, health spa, ballroom, yoga studio, and three Olympic-sized swimming pools. The top six levels are reserved for the family's private living space, while the lower levels house parking for 168 cars and a garage with a private auto service station. The family's snow chamber is another feature where they retreat to escape the Mumbai heat, with walls meant to spew fake snowflakes. The family members move between floors using nine super-fast elevators, and there are three helipads constructed into the megastructure, pending operational permissions. Antilia's motif is built on pastels, providing a tranquil vibe to the entire estate. 

"Mukesh Ambani - ANTILIA House Tour," The discussion shifts from the interior design and features of Antilia to the controversy surrounding its acquisition. The land for Antilia was originally claimed by the Maharashtra Waqf and Revenue Minister, Nawab Malik, who argued that it was intended for the education of disadvantaged Khoja children. Critics also accused Mukesh Ambani of purchasing the property at a significantly lower price than market value. Despite these disputes, Ambani obtained a no-objection certificate from the Waqf Board and began development on Antilia. The mansion houses around 600 staff members, who are provided living quarters and work 24/7. Antilia has 27 stories, six floors dedicated to vehicles, and a snow room to help the Ambani family beat the heat. Critics, including Ratan Tata and Arundhati Roy, have expressed concerns about the wealth disparity and the Ambanis' perceived disconnection from their impoverished origins. Despite the controversy, Antilia's opulence and luxury continue to draw admiration from many.